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Running script (行書)

Running, or semicursive, script (xingshu) appeared in the decades immediately after the Han dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE). It reached the final stage of its formative development in the fourth century. In running script, individual strokes are sometimes eliminated or condensed, and separate characters are joined by linking strokes. Due to its ease, convenience, and legibility, running script quickly became the most popular form of Chinese freehand writing in everyday use, and it retains that status today.
F1990.5 detail, example of Running Script

Detail from Poem on Lingyan Temple, in running script. View full.


As renovation work continues in the Freer Gallery, the Sackler Gallery also will close on July 10, 2017. This museum-wide closure will allow us to completely reinstall our exhibitions and revitalize features to improve your visit. Both spaces will reopen on October 14, 2017, when we will welcome the public back to the Freer|Sackler: two galleries, one destination. For your safety, all visitors will have their bags checked. See the complete list of restricted items and bag sizes.