Chamunda
Nepal, 14th century. Copper, gemstones, traces of pigment, and gilt. Lent by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, General Acquisitions Fund.

This tiny Nepalese Devi, in her terrifying cosmic form as Chamunda, is one of the most arresting, macabre, and imaginative of images; it is both iconographically complex and technically demanding. With a trio of human skulls as her seat and a cadaver as her footrest, the emaciated form of Chamunda is richly adorned with conventional ornaments as well as a stupendous garland of severed heads suspended by their hair.
A bear's skin is tied over Chamunda's clinging skirt, with its head and legs dangling beside her buttocks. She wears the skin of an elephant as a cape and grasps two of the animal's feet in her uppermost hands. In her other hands she brandishes an array of weapons and awe-inspiring objects. Devi manifested herself as this menacing form to combat the powerful demon generals Chanda and Munda, whom she slayed after a fierce battle

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Chamunda