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3/4 profile: Tea bowl, Ki-Irabo type interior: Tea bowl, Ki-Irabo type base: Tea bowl, Ki-Irabo type

Tea bowl, Ki-Irabo type

Type
Tea bowl (Ki-Irabo chawan)
Historical period(s)
Joseon period, early 17th century
Medium
Stoneware with opaque wood-ash glaze; gold lacquer repairs
Style
Possibly Beopgi-ri ware
Dimension(s)
H x W: 6.1 x 12.8 cm (2 3/8 x 5 1/16 in)
Geography
Korea, Gyeongsangnam-do province, Yangsan, possibly Beopgi-ri kilns
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1911.376
Label
The type of tea bowl known in Japan as Ki-Irabo (Yellow Irabo) was made in Korea to Japanese order beginning in the early seventeenth century. This type of bowl is characterized by coarse, stony clay and an ochre-colored ash glaze. Bowls of this type were replicated at various kilns in Japan, including the Karatsu kilns in northern Kyushu and the Rakuzan kiln in Matsue.

To 1911
Y. Fujita and Company, Kyoto, to 1911 [1]

From 1911 to 1919
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919), purchased from Y. Fujita and Company in 1911 [2]

From 1920
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Charles Lang Freer in 1920 [3]

Notes:

[1] See Original Pottery List, L. 2163, pg. 552, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Bought by C.L. Freer from Y. Fujita, Kyoto, while on a trip during 1910-1911 (see Curatorial Remark 1 in the object record).

[2] See note 1.

[3] The original deed of Charles Lang Freer's gift was signed in 1906. The collection was received in 1920 upon the completion of the Freer Gallery.

Former owner
Y. Fujita and Company (C.L. Freer source)
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919)
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Keyword(s)
Beopgi-ri ware, Joseon period (1392 - 1910), Korea, lacquer repair, stoneware, tea
Collection(s) Area
Korean Art
Web Resource(s)
Korean Ceramics, Google Cultural Institute

Rights Statement
Copyright with museum






We are excited to reopen the Freer in October 2017, following a renovation to allow us to better present our art and serve our visitors. The Sackler remains open, with a full lineup of exhibitions and events both in the museum and around DC. For your safety, all visitors will have their bags checked. See the complete list of restricted items and bag sizes.